Remembering 1914-18 :: Share your First World War objects and stories

2 Posted by - 20 May 2015 - Events

Judith Dahl Taylor, from the  National Museum of Australia, explains how you can share your First World War objects and stories on the Museum’s new interactive website for future generations to explore. 

The National Museum of Australia is the place where Australia’s stories come alive.

To commemorate the centenary of the First World War, the Museum has launched its interactive website Remembering 1914 –18 Objects, Stories and Emotions, which will build a collaborative online collection of First World War experiences.

The interactive website creates a national connection to the people and events of 1914‒18. You can explore life, love and war as experienced in a young nation a century ago. The interactive’s content consists of object photos and their background stories as well as key events in Australia and at the front.

‘Keep a brave heart’. Image courtesy Katie Shanahan and NMA.

‘Keep a brave heart’. Image courtesy Katie Shanahan and NMA.

You can browse the Remembering website by emotion, via the timeline, images, object list or simply use the search engine. You can get involved by uploading an image of an object that relates to the First World War and tell us something about the object and your connection to it. Users can also create collections and tag items with specific emotions.

The interactive remains open until 11 November 2018 and will then become a permanent digital archive and learning resource for future generations.

The launch of Remembering coincides with the Museum’s exhibition The Home Front: Australia during the First World War, which is on show until 11 October 2015.

To participate and help create an enduring digital archive, you can sign up on our website to participate and then:
• upload an object image connected to the First World War and, if you wish, share the story behind it. Your object and story will be checked by the Remembering project team so it may take a day or so before they are published.
• create your own collections made up of your own objects or objects already on the interactive.

For more information, visit remembering.nma.gov.au

Tobacco tin containing cigarette cards collected by Alice Eaton (née Yoxon). Image courtesy National Museum of Australia and Jason McCarthy.

Tobacco tin containing cigarette cards collected by Alice Eaton (née Yoxon). Image courtesy National Museum of Australia and Jason McCarthy.

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