Bob's Your Uncle (perhaps literally!) :: A reader's success story

Bob’s Your Uncle (perhaps literally!) :: A reader’s success story

To our excitement, one of our readers recently emailed Inside History to share a success story that came about thanks to our magazine’s ‘Bob’s Your Uncle’ section in which family historians can appeal for information from other researchers. Here, Debby Gower explains how answering a writer’s call-out in Bob’s Your Uncle helped, eventually, re-unite...
New series of Who Do You Think You Are? premieres tonight! + Inside History chats to this series' celebs

New series of Who Do You Think You Are? premieres tonight! + Inside History chats to this series’ celebs

In exciting news for family historians around the country, the much-loved SBS show Who Do You Think You Are? returns to our screens tonight at 7:30pm with the premiere of series 6! This series features a diverse line-up of Aussie celebrities including actors Richard Roxburgh, Jacki Weaver, Rebecca Gibney, and...
The history and future of the Mitchell Library

The history and future of the Mitchell Library

Plans for the restoration and renewal of the State Library of NSW‘s Mitchell Library were recently revised following public feedback. Paula Grunseit speaks with Richard Neville, the tenth Mitchell Librarian, about change, history, and the future of libraries. Richard Neville began using the Mitchell Library as an undergraduate when he...
The infamous HMAS Sydney/Emden battle of 1914 :: We talk to Mike Carlton

The infamous HMAS Sydney/Emden battle of 1914 :: We talk to Mike Carlton

What if things had turned out differently for Mike Carlton and he had become a naval officer instead of a journalist and author? It’s something he still wonders about as he tells Paula Grunseit during a conversation on all things naval history – plus his latest book, First Victory: 1914 - HMAS...
Remembering the Mt Kembla mine disaster :: 96 Candles Ceremony, 31 July

Remembering the Mt Kembla mine disaster :: 96 Candles Ceremony, 31 July

On Thursday 31 July, the 112th anniversary of Australia’s worst industrial disaster, the Mt Kembla community will gather to honour those who were lost – and those who survived. Here, Paul Treanor, who runs a website on the Mt Kembla mine disaster, looks at why the  tragedy occurred and how...
Inside History exclusive :: Old map of Bathurst and Cox’s Road rediscovered

Inside History exclusive :: Old map of Bathurst and Cox’s Road rediscovered

Australia’s colonial history continues to unearth surprises. Bathurst historian Robin McLachlan, an Adjunct Senior Lecturer at Charles Sturt University, made an amazing discovery among the digitised images of the UK National Archives: an amazing 1815 map, signed by Governor Macquarie himself.  Over the past couple of years I have been working for Bathurst...
Place Names as Historical Records workshop at History House, Sydney :: 21 June 2014

Place Names as Historical Records workshop at History House, Sydney :: 21 June 2014

This Saturday, on 21 June, a joint Royal Australian Historical Society and Professional Historians Association NSW workshop will explore how the name of a place can form a historical record in its own right. Toponymy is the study of place names. These names form a fluid layer of the landscape,...
How to Ask an Expert :: Help them help you

How to Ask an Expert :: Help them help you

So you’ve got an opportunity to ‘Ask an Expert’ a burning question about that stubborn brick wall stunting your family tree – what next? Inside History‘s own resident genealogical expert, Shauna Hicks, says getting the most out of this exciting opportunity takes preparation and organisation. Here, she shares her tips...
Top 10 Out and About Genie Activities

Top 10 Out and About Genie Activities

As a prolific blogger and long-time family historian from Darwin, Pauleen Cass of Family History Across the Seas knows a thing or two about the joys of genealogy online. But here, instead, she takes a step away from the keyboard and shares with us her top 10 ways to take...
The Myall Creek massacre re-examined

The Myall Creek massacre re-examined

In the latest issue of Inside History magazine, we examine a particularly harrowing episode of Australian history. The Myall Creek massacre in 1838 was an act of genocide in which up to 28 Aboriginal men, women and children were murdered. Revisiting Myall Creek 176 years on, Mark Tedeschi AM QC, the Senior Crown...
Victorian Community History Awards entries now open

Victorian Community History Awards entries now open

Entries are now being accepted into the prestigious Victorian Community History Awards, which recognise outstanding examples of historical research and interpretation of Victoria’s heritage. The Victorian Community History Awards, managed by Public Record Office Victoria in partnership with the Royal Historical Society of Victoria, have been held each year since...
Scottish soldiers' wills now online on ScotlandsPeople

Scottish soldiers’ wills now online on ScotlandsPeople

Historic wills of some 31,000 Scottish soldiers are now available on ScotlandsPeople thanks to the National Records of Scotland. Released to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War, the collection includes some 26,000 wills of World War One soldiers. This represents about 20 per cent...
New exhibition reimagines  Cook’s 1770 encounter. At the Australian National Maritime Museum

New exhibition reimagines Cook’s 1770 encounter. At the Australian National Maritime Museum

The story of James Cook‘s voyage along the Australian east coast is one we all know well. Historical perspectives of Cook’s first interactions with Aboriginal people have been told through the artworks and diary entries of Banks, Cook and his crew. But what if you had an opportunity to hear...
10 useful websites for convict research

10 useful websites for convict research

Historical research is becoming more and more accessible online, with the new collections being made available. Anyone, at any time, can discover an untold story. Daniel McKay lists ten websites that are making tracing the journey of some long-dead convict across the globe a little easier. 1. Google No, this...
To Make a Bridge. Where did the granite of the Sydney Harbour Bridge come from?

To Make a Bridge. Where did the granite of the Sydney Harbour Bridge come from?

In 1924, John Gilmore and his young family came to Australia  from Scotland to partake in the flurry of industry surrounding the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. He became quarry manager in the small south coast town of Moruya, from whose quarries came the granite that built the famous...
The Forgotten Diggers of Wau. New Guinea in World War 2

The Forgotten Diggers of Wau. New Guinea in World War 2

It was a battle the Australian troops fought against the Japanese, and against all odds amid the treacherous conditions of New Guinea. Here, David Buckwalter remembers the little-known Battle for Wau. About two months before the first shots on Kokoda had sounded a small group of commandos, the 2/5th Australian...
Dream Merchants :: Australia's Greek Cafés

Dream Merchants :: Australia’s Greek Cafés

Every time you drink a Coke, enjoy an ice cream or sweet chocolate treat, go to the cinema, or listen to the latest popular music hit, you can thank Australia’s Greek cafés. Leonard Janiszewski and Effy Alexakis, who have been researching the history of Australia’s Greek cafés for over a...
"Good, fearless soldiers". Craig Tibbitts on the AWM’s Anzac Voices

“Good, fearless soldiers”. Craig Tibbitts on the AWM’s Anzac Voices

The Australian War Memorial’s Craig Tibbitts reveals the story of two brothers who faced the horrors of Pozières in 1916, and looks at why their letters are so important. In 1927 the Australian War Memorial’s Director, John Treloar, wrote to the Reverend John Garrard Raws about the wartime letters of...
Find your servicewoman in the archives

Find your servicewoman in the archives

Shauna Hicks looks at the Australian Women’s Register a resource that may help you locate your lady. The Australian Women’s Register is part of the Australian Women’s’ Archive Project, an initiative of the National Foundation of Australian Women in conjunction with the University of Melbourne. It can be a very quick...
10 things you may not know about Sydney

10 things you may not know about Sydney

Sydney businesswomen in the 1790s Our earliest known film 6000-year-old discovery in Alexandria Tamarama rollercoaster The mortuary train Sydney’s (unofficial) queen Our hidden lake The man who was hanged on Fort Denison “Professor” Parker, the “champion of Australia” Coffee Culture 1. Sydney businesswomen in the 1790s One of the earliest...
Saving Maitland's Jewish Cemetery by the UNE's Janis Wilton

Saving Maitland’s Jewish Cemetery by the UNE’s Janis Wilton

In great news for the heritage of the Hunter region, Maitland Jewish Cemetery has recently been granted State Heritage listing! As we celebrate the good news, we revisit what historian and University of New England professor Janis Wilton had to say about the great work being done to protect the at-risk...
Making (historic) tracks :: discovering the history of Australia's Top End

Making (historic) tracks :: discovering the history of Australia’s Top End

Dorian Mode and Lydia Thorpe discover the recent history of the Top End via one of Australia’s great rail journeys- The Ghan. Named after the hardy Afghan pioneers who, like the Chinese, were the harbingers of multiculturalism in Australia, The Ghan (www.greatsouthernrail.com.au) has a fascinating and rich narrative. You may be...
Long Way Home tours: to tell the personal stories of Australian servicemen and women

Long Way Home tours: to tell the personal stories of Australian servicemen and women

The Long Way Home, a unique theatrical production resulting from a historic collaboration between Sydney Theatre Company (STC) and the Australian Defence Force (ADF), is currently touring Australia. The play, written by Daniel Keene, conveys the personal stories of Australian servicemen and women who have served in Iraq, Afghanistan, East Timor and...
100 Years of Red Cross in Armidale. UNE seeks information for an exhibition

100 Years of Red Cross in Armidale. UNE seeks information for an exhibition

August 2014 marks the centenary of the Red Cross in Armidale. This organisation was formed in the shadows of World War I and its members contributed to many of the activities designed to support the wounded and sick troops and the innocent victims of the war. The UNE Heritage Centre...
Anzacs & the empire. Robyn Van Dyk on the AWM's Anzac Voices

Anzacs & the empire. Robyn Van Dyk on the AWM’s Anzac Voices

The Australian War Memorial’s new exhibition focuses on the inner voices of the our Anzacs during World War I. Its curator, Robyn van Dyk, explains what will be on show. Letters to a sweetheart; diaries of a hard-fought campaign; postcards scrawled in the trenches, hospitals, ships, and battlefields of war....
Our living legacy. Touring Sydney's Vaucluse House and Elizabeth Farm

Our living legacy. Touring Sydney’s Vaucluse House and Elizabeth Farm

Visiting and wandering through a historic home can prove to be a fascinating and richly rewarding experience even for those with only a passing interest in history. Adam Woodhams tours two historic houses and their gardens for a wonderful glimpse into their past. A well preserved and presented property provides...
Inside History a finalist at the Publishers Australia Excellence Awards

Inside History a finalist at the Publishers Australia Excellence Awards

Inside History magazine has been named a finalist at the annual Publishers Australia Excellence Awards. The only history magazine to achieve a place, Inside History magazine came fourth in the Multi Channel Brand of the Year category. This competitive category received the largest number of entries, making Inside History’s achievement...
Parramatta Female Factory :: Our fair ladies

Parramatta Female Factory :: Our fair ladies

Around one in five Australians are related to women who were incarcerated at the Parramatta Female Factory. The Factory itself is one of our most significant historical spaces; a Francis Greenway building and our oldest convict women’s site. But now its survival is under threat Paula Grunseit spoke to historians...
WW1 centenary to place WA's Albany in the spotlight in 2014

WW1 centenary to place WA’s Albany in the spotlight in 2014

The picturesque and historic coastal city of Albany, Western Australia, will be the focus of international attention next year when it hosts the first in a series of commemorative and community events as the curtain raiser to the Anzac Centenary period. Thousands of Australian and New Zealand troops departed from...
Biographical Database of Australia has launched with a new view of the early colony

Biographical Database of Australia has launched with a new view of the early colony

The Biographical Database of Australia (BDA) is a new research tool for historians and genealogists. It’s now available to subscribe and explore! The project aims to collect surviving records of all people who lived in Australia from the 18th to early 20th centuries, and collate their biographies in a fully...
Fair thee well. Family photos found at a Queensland vintage fair!

Fair thee well. Family photos found at a Queensland vintage fair!

One person’s trash is another person’s treasure? This was definitely the case for librarian and genealogist, Jane Harding, when she recently discovered — quite by chance — some priceless family heirlooms at a vintage fair on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast. One Saturday morning a few years ago, I cajoled my sister...
Exploring digital history with NLA's Tim Sherratt

Exploring digital history with NLA’s Tim Sherratt

There are a host of online tools emerging that allow you to query data and share research in exciting and innovative ways. Tim Sherratt, the manager of Trove, is one of the developers and digital historians leading the way, with projects including Mapping Our Anzacs and Invisible Australians. Here, Tim looks at...
15 great historic getaways

15 great historic getaways

From convict settlements to historic ports, Indigenous sites to goldrush villages, there’s an array of destinations close to home just waiting to be discovered. Sarah Trevor explores 15 fascinating contenders for the history lover’s dream holiday! New Norfolk, Tasmania. Nestled in the scenic Derwent Valley 32km northwest of Hobart, New...
Expert Q&A :: Irish immigration with Dr Richard Reid and Dr Perry McIntyre

Expert Q&A :: Irish immigration with Dr Richard Reid and Dr Perry McIntyre

For our Expert Q&A on Thursday, June 6 we had Dr Richard Reid and Dr Perry McIntyre to answer your questions about Irish immigration in the 1800s. Thanks again to Richard and Perry for giving us all the benefit of their time and expertise. Don’t forget our Expert Q&As happen...
Finding Henry Lawson in North Sydney's streets by Ian Hoskins

Finding Henry Lawson in North Sydney’s streets by Ian Hoskins

He was the “city bushman” whose stories are still loved the country over. North Sydney historian, Ian Hoskins, was surprised by how much his own neighbourhood was reflected in Lawson’s writings and his life… Henry Lawson was born in 1867 and spent his first 16 years or so in western...
Sydney's first water supply. Our Tank Stream

Sydney’s first water supply. Our Tank Stream

Every year about 3,000 people enter the Sydney Living Museum ballot to get on this tour. I’d waited for years to tour the Tank Stream – it’s one of the pieces of Australian history that I heard about early in my life and I’d wanted to see this little waterway for myself for...
Heritage travel :: Western Australian early history by Richard Offen

Heritage travel :: Western Australian early history by Richard Offen

The wondrous and occasionally off-beat history of Western Australia is little known outside its vast borders. Richard Offen, executive director of Heritage Perth, takes us for a whirlwind tour through its historic gems. This article first appeared in our Issue 15: Mar-Apr 2013 edition. WHEN I arrived in Western Australia...
The Beersheba Chargers by Neil Smith

The Beersheba Chargers by Neil Smith

Piecing together war diaries and official records leads military historian Neil Smith AM to discover the heart-wrenching stories of the men and horses of the 4th Australian Light Horse regiment at the Battle of Beersheba. Neil C Smith AM is head of Mostly Unsung, which publishes on a range of...
Why you should use FamilySearch Family History Centres

Why you should use FamilySearch Family History Centres

Families share an enduring bond that reaches across the generations. FamilySearch can help you trace your ancestors with an expert network across Australia and New Zealand. Many dedicated genealogists would be familiar with FamilySearch and no doubt have spent many hours searching its website for elusive ancestors. There are millions...
Latest entries
Review :: Anzac's Long Shadow: The cost of our national obsession by James Brown

Review :: Anzac’s Long Shadow: The cost of our national obsession by James Brown

Publisher: Redback | Review by Russell Eldridge, for Byron Bay Writers’ Festival It’s about time a book like this came along, as a counterweight to the bronzed Anzac hero-worship culture that engenders a lop-sided, jingoistic view of Australia’s armed forces. This is not an anti-military book. Far from it. Brown is a former Army officer...
New exhibition reimagines  Cook’s 1770 encounter. At the Australian National Maritime Museum

New exhibition reimagines Cook’s 1770 encounter. At the Australian National Maritime Museum

The story of James Cook‘s voyage along the Australian east coast is one we all know well. Historical perspectives of Cook’s first interactions with Aboriginal people have been told through the artworks and diary entries of Banks, Cook and his crew. But what if you had an opportunity to hear the story from different perspectives?...
Discovering the lost diggers of Vignacourt

Discovering the lost diggers of Vignacourt

In 2011 journalist Ross Coulthart was part of the team that unearthed the collection of glass plate images of Aussie soldiers in Vignacourt. Here, Ross talks about the next chapter in the Diggers’ stories. Don’t miss The Lost Diggers of Vignacourt, the Australian War Memorial Traveling Exhibition touring Australia. This must see exhibition is currently...
Be part of Sydney Town Hall's history :: Open Day, 3 May 2014

Be part of Sydney Town Hall’s history :: Open Day, 3 May 2014

On 3 May, Sydney Town Hall is hosting a special open day as part of the National Trust’s Heritage Festival. Sydneysiders are encouraged to come along and share their memories, stories and any memorabilia they may have relating to Sydney Town Hall for a forthcoming exhibition. Sydney Town Hall, built in the 1880s, is an iconic...
Expert Q&A :: Exploring the Powerhouse Museum and Australian Dress Register

Expert Q&A :: Exploring the Powerhouse Museum and Australian Dress Register

For our Expert Q&A on Thursday, 20 March we had Lindie Ward and Anni Turnbull from the Powerhouse Museum join us to answer your questions about the Powerhouse Museum collections, Australian Dress Register and Australian historical fashion. Thanks to Lindie and Anni for giving us the benefit of their expertise. Please find the transcript of the...
Latest newspapers added to Trove

Latest newspapers added to Trove

2014 has been a busy year so far for everyone’s favourite historic newspaper resource. Dozens of newspapers and thousands of pages have been added to Trove’s already extensive collection. Because here at Inside History we are such big fans of Trove – much like our readers! – we thought we’d list the latest newspapers to have...
The Memorial’s Guide to ANZAC Day

The Memorial’s Guide to ANZAC Day

ANZAC Day developed from the commemoration of the Australian and New Zealand soldiers who lost their lives on Gallipoli during the First World War. Although the campaign failed, the endurance and sacrifice of those soldiers led to the creation of the “ANZAC legend”. Over the years, ANZAC Day has broadened to include the commemoration of...